Species

BackHemicycla diegoi Neiber, R. Vega-Luz, Ro. Vega-Luz & Koenemann, 2011

Hemicycla diegoi Neiber, R. Vega-Luz, Ro. Vega-Luz & Koenemann, 2011

  • Kingdom: Animalia
  • Phylum:
  • Class: Mollusca
  • Order: Gastropoda
  • Family: Helicidae
LC Least Concern
IUCN Red List Status:

Countries of Occurrence:
Spain - Canaries

Archipelago(s):
Canaries

Assessor/s:
Groh, K.

Reviewer/s:
Seddon, M.B., Teixeira, D., Cameron, R., Neubert, E. & Allen, D.J.

Contributor/s:
Neubert, E.

Facilitators / Compilers/s:


Assessment Rationale:

This species is endemic to the island of Tenerife in Spain. It has an extremely restricted area of occupancy (AOO; 4 km2) and is known from only one location. However, there are no known threats to the species. It is therefore considered as Near Threatened (NT), almost meeting criterion B as, due to its extremely restricted AOO, it is prone to any stochastic events, such as fires. Further research is needed upon the distribution, population size and trend of the species.

Geographic Range:

This species is endemic to the Teno Peninsula in the far northwest of the Island of Tenerife (Neiber et al. 2011) in the Canary Islands, Spain

Regions:
Spain - Canaries
Extent of Occurrence (EOO):
4 (km2)
Area of Occupancy (AOO):
4 (km2)
Elevation Lower Limit:
100 (m)
Elevation Upper Limit:
300 (m)
Biogeographic Realms:
Paleartic
Presence:
Extant
Origin:
Endemic Canaries
Seasonality:
Resident

Population:

There is no information available on the population size or trend of this species. It is present in some abundance at the site (K. Groh pers. comm. 2016).

Habitat and Ecology

This species is found in dry temperate shrub vegetation (Piso Basal).

Major Threat(s):

There are no major threats to this species. There is no ongoing habitat disturbance. It is present on an extremely steep slope and hence it is not likely to be affected by urbanization.

Conservation Actions

There is no conservation action in place for this species. Further research is needed upon the distribution, population size and trend of the species.