Species

BackNapaeus elegans Alonso & Ibañez, 1995

Napaeus elegans Alonso & Ibañez, 1995

  • Kingdom: Animalia
  • Phylum:
  • Class: Mollusca
  • Order: Gastropoda
  • Family: Enidae
VU Vulnerable
IUCN Red List Status:

Countries of Occurrence:
Spain - Canaries

Archipelago(s):
Canaries

Assessor/s:
Groh, K. & Alonso, M.R.

Reviewer/s:
Neubert, E., Seddon, M.B. & Cuttelod, A.

Contributor/s:

Facilitators / Compilers/s:


Assessment Rationale:

This species is assessed as Vulnerable B2ab(iii), as it occurs in two small areas, however as there are steep slopes between these areas, the number of locations is likely to be more extensive and to be more than five, and hence the species is considered to be less threatened. Gomez et al. (2001) suggest that this species is sensitive to habitat disturbance and that protected areas and monitoring of habitat trends would be necessary to assess the status in the future.

Geographic Range:

This species is endemic to the far west of northern Tenerife from two isolated lcoations, Masca (four sites, one location) and the other Punta de Teno (one location) (Alonso et al. 1995).

Regions:
Spain - Canaries
Extent of Occurrence (EOO):
(km2)
Area of Occupancy (AOO):
20 (km2)
Elevation Lower Limit:
40 (m)
Elevation Upper Limit:
900 (m)
Biogeographic Realms:
Paleartic
Presence:
Extant
Origin:
Endemic Canaries
Seasonality:
Resident

Population:

Only 30 specimens are known in total. There are no population trends.

Habitat and Ecology

This species is found in typical dry lowland vegetation (Piso basal and Piso infracanario) with succulent and thorny shrubs between 40 and 900 m asl.

Major Threat(s):

There are permanent influence of tourism and recreational activities in the area (walking trails, 4 x 4 safaris, and general disturbance for creating small facilities) and Gomez et al.(2001) suggests that this species is sensitive to habitat disturbance.

Conservation Actions

Gomez et al. (2001) suggest that this species is sensitive to habitat disturbance. Creation of protected areas is recommended and monitoring of habitat trends would be necessary to assess the status in the future.