Species

BackPseudolycoriella campanulata Frey, 1945

Pseudolycoriella campanulata Frey, 1945

Fungus midge, Dark-winged fungus gnat

  • Kingdom: Animalia
  • Phylum: Arthropoda
  • Class: Insecta
  • Order: Diptera
  • Family: Sciaridae
DD Data Deficient
IUCN Red List Status:

Countries of Occurrence:
Portugal - Azores

Archipelago(s):
Azores

Reviewer/s:
Russell, N.

Contributor/s:

Facilitators / Compilers/s:


Assessment Rationale:

Pseudolycoriela campanulata is an endemic species of the Azores (Portugal), known from Flores, Terceira and S. Miguel islands. It is possible that this species has declined in the past as a result of human activity, but the present situation of this species needs to be further assessed, and further research is needed into its population, distribution, threats, ecology and life history. Based upon the lack of recent data regarding this species' population, distribution, threats and ecology, it is not possible to accurately estimate the extinction risk of the species and it could theoretically fall into any category. Therefore, it is assessed as Data Deficient (DD). Conservation/restoration of native wet and boggy areas, as well as invasive plant species control, could potentially aid this species' conservation.

Geographic Range:

Pseudolycoriella campanulata is an Azorean-endemic species described from the islands of Flores, Terceira and S. Miguel (Azores, Portugal) (Borges et al. 2010). This species has been collected in areas of moorland and of geothermal springs, with one of the sites being currently highly degraded. Based on the historical data (Frey 1945), the Extent of Occurrence (EOO) would be ca. 10,570 km² and the Area of Occupancy (AOO) would be ca. 28 km². However, there is no recent information regarding the distribution of this species, and the actual full distribution of the species is unknown.

Regions:
Portugal - Azores
Extent of Occurrence (EOO):
(km2)
Area of Occupancy (AOO):
(km2)
Elevation Lower Limit:
10 (m)
Elevation Upper Limit:
550 (m)
Biogeographic Realms:
Palearctic
Presence:
Extant
Origin:
Endemic Azores
Seasonality:
Resident

Population:

No current population size estimates exist for this species, and the overall population size and trend are essentially unknown.

 

Habitat and Ecology

Specimens of Pseudolycoriella campanulata have been collected in moorland and in the vicinity of geothermal springs (Furnas, S. Miguel), but the specific ecology and traits of this species are unknown. Sciaridae can be found mostly in forests, swamps, and moist meadows. The adults are found in foliage, while the larvae on the substrate of which they feed, namely fungi, decaying vegetation, animal excrement, plant roots or in rotten wood and under the bark of fallen trees (McAlpine et al. 1981). Sciaridae larvae can be considered pests in greenhouses and of commercially cultivated mushrooms.

Major Threat(s):

A lack of information regarding the present status of this species precludes an assessment of potential threats. Nevertheless, the ecology of other members of the Sciaridae family, and the locations where this species was collected, suggests that this species might be affected by future habitat declines as a consequence of climate change (Ferreira et al. 2016) and increased droughts. This species has been collected in areas that are disturbed to a greater or lesser extent, and so past and present human disturbances might have also affected this species, as well as habitat degradation by invasive species. Since one of the sites was in a area of hot springs, future violent geothermal activity might also affect this species.

Conservation Actions

The species is not protected by regional law. The present situation of this species needs to be further assessed, and further research is needed into its population, distribution, threats, ecology and life history. From what is known of its habitat preferences, conservation of native wet and boggy areas, as well as invasive species control, could potentially aid this species' conservation. Historically at least, this species was present in areas that are currently included in the Natural Parks of Terceira and S. Miguel, disturbed or otherwise.