Species

BackDolichopus marshalli Parent, 1933

Dolichopus marshalli Parent, 1933

Long-legged fly

  • Kingdom: Animalia
  • Phylum: Arthropoda
  • Class: Insecta
  • Order: Diptera
  • Family: DOLICHOPODIDAE
DD Data Deficient
IUCN Red List Status:

Countries of Occurrence:
Portugal - Azores

Archipelago(s):
Azores

Reviewer/s:
Danielczak, A.

Contributor/s:

Facilitators / Compilers/s:


Assessment Rationale:

Dolichopus marshalli is an endemic species of the Azores (Portugal), described from an unknown site on Pico island. The present situation of this species needs to be further assessed, and further research is needed into its population, distribution, threats, ecology and life history. Based upon the lack of data regarding this species status, population, distribution, threats and ecology, this species is assessed as Data Deficient (DD). 

Geographic Range:

Dolichopus marshalli is an endemic species that was described from specimens collected in 1929 in an unknown location on Pico island (Azores, Portugal). It was never found after its description and consequently there is no precise indication of its location or current status.

Regions:
Portugal - Azores
Extent of Occurrence (EOO):
4 (km2)
Area of Occupancy (AOO):
4 (km2)
Elevation Lower Limit:
(m)
Elevation Upper Limit:
(m)
Biogeographic Realms:
Paleartic
Presence:
Extant
Origin:
Endemic Azores
Seasonality:
Resident

Population:

No current population size estimates exist for this species.

Current Population Trend: Unknown 

Habitat and Ecology

The ecology and traits of this species are unknown. Adults and most larvae of other species of Dolichopodidae are predators, feeding on other arthropods, with the adults of some species being notable predators of Culicidae (McAlpine et al. 1987). The larvae occupy a wide range of habitats, living generally in moist environments such as soil, moist sand, or rotting organic matter. The larvae pupate in cocoons made of cemented soil particles. Dolichopodidae in general inhabit lightly shaded areas near swamps and streams, or in meadows and woodlands (McAlpine et al. 1987).

Systems: Terrestrial 

Major Threat(s):

A lack of information regarding the site or habitat where this species was collected, or regarding the present status of this species precludes an assessment of potential threats. 

Conservation Actions

The species is not protected by regional law. The present situation of this species needs to be further assessed, and further research is needed into its population, distribution, threats, ecology and life history.